Are car insurance rates higher depending on where I live?


How much does where I live impact my car insurance rates?

Where you live makes a considerable impact on your car insurance rates. Drivers in larger cities pay higher car insurance rates due to the higher likelihood of being involved in a fender bender. Larger cities also have higher incidents of car theft, hit-and-run accidents, smash-and-grab thefts, road rage probability, and also longer commutes that keep you on the road longer. These factors all increase the rates you pay for your car insurance.

But don't think that living in the country will get you the lowest rates either! Areas of the country where hail is probable will pay substantially higher rates than those areas of the country where hail is not as prevalent. Rural areas also have a higher chance of animal collisions such as deer or cattle on the roadway. Areas prone to flooding present another risk of loss that will raise your rates as well. Icy and snowy winter driving add to the risk of having a car accident, so drivers in colder climates pay a premium to drive during the winter months.

So regardless of where you live, there's a good chance that you are paying higher car insurance rates for one or more of the above reasons. If you think you're paying too much for your car insurance, enter your zip code below and take a few minutes to complete the quick quote form. You'll receive competitive quotes from multiple companies that can save you a ton on your car insurance regardless of where you live!

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